The ‘snark’ punctuation

Well how about this – punctuation to denote sarcasm called the snark! What an interesting idea.

[I]t’s one of the coolest, most utilitarian, but least-used punctuation marks around…

The easy-to-write—and type—symbol is simply a period followed by a tilde [.~]. It was created around 2007 by American typographer Choz Cunningham as an end-of-sentence mark that could denote verbal irony in writing. Its intended use is to help readers understand when the meaning of a sentence is actually very different to what the sum of its words seem to mean.

Authors wouldn’t have to write ‘(S)he said sarcastically’ every time, and instead allow for more flow and intuitive recognition of the style of speech. I think we need to spread the use of the snark! Or rather; “this is totally a terrible idea.~” 😛

Read more in the article below 😀

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Monash Event – 25 Years of Archival and Recordkeeping Research and Education

On September 17th, Monash University put on a wonderful event to celebrate this year being the 25th anniversary of archival and recordkeeping research and education at Monash:

In 1990 Sue McKemmish joined Frank Upward, Livia Iacovino and others in the Graduate School of Librarianship to develop an innovative, ground-breaking education program and establish the Records Continuum Research Group as a focal point for the international community of researchers, educators and practitioners exploring and utilising continuum conceptualisations of recordkeeping.

Our alumni have been an important part of that success. Many have gone on to play leadership roles within the profession, and are role models and mentors to the next generation of recordkeeping professionals.

And so we were invited to attend a cocktail reception, again with amazing catering 😉

(There was a lecture before the reception, but unfortunately I was working and unable to attend.)

It was a wonderful evening and I thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to catch up with friends, reconnect with classmates, lecturers and tutors, share Monash memories, and celebrate achievements. I met some new inspirational people and learnt more about the history of Monash education in this field. We had a laugh adding memories to a memory board and looking through some kind of art installation that we couldn’t quite figure out.

The highlight of the evening was of course the photobooth! I will cherish the photos I got with such influential people in my life and career. I love my GLAMR peeps!

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Thank you Monash, for not only providing an extremely high level of education, but for also enabling my continued connection with Monash networks through these wonderful events.

Thanks for Reading,

Michelle De Aizpurua

International Librarians Network – Featured Article!

How exciting! I have been featured in a short article on the International Librarians Network (ILN) website. The article talks about LIS studies, and provides my two top tips for students. You can read it here.

I have been a member of the peer mentoring program through the ILN since 2014 and have been thoroughly enjoying the opportunity to learn from professionals all across the globe. My current partner is from the Philippines and we have had some fantastic discussions about Library studies and work. It fascinates me to learn about the differences, and the many similarities, we face in the field in such different parts of the world.

If you have the time to commit to an email pen-pal situation, sign up for the next intake on their website.

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Thanks for reading,

Michelle De Aizpurua

2015 Whyte Memorial Lecture

Last night I attended the annual Whyte Memorial Lecture run by Monash University. It is a free event and one worth attending if you are in the GLAMR field.

“The annual Whyte Memorial Lecture celebrates the legacy of the late Jean Whyte and her sister Phyllis. Professor Jean Whyte was the foundation professor in the Graduate School of Librarianship at Monash University. The sisters left generous bequests to Monash to support research in librarianship, archives and records, and to support the library’s research collection in English literature, librarianship and philosophy.” (Monash University website)

This years topic was ‘Keeping, forgetting, and misreading digital material: libraries learning from archives and recordkeeping practice’ presented by Professor Ross Harvey from RMIT University. The event was live tweeted and you can get a broad idea of the event from Jaye Weatherburn’s storify here.

In the invitation I received to attend (as a Monash alumni) the topic was described:

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Language Fun

I love to learn new things about linguistics, language can be such fun!

Today I learnt that some dictionaries have recently added the ‘informal, non-literal version of literally’ – where individuals use it as a statement for something that is only figurative. i.e. “It literally blew my head off”.

Read a short article about it here.

It turns out this is called an ‘auto antonym’ – and there are a lot more of them! How interesting.

There is a bit of list on Wiktionary which is lots of fun to read and gasp at. I also noticed one myself while working recently – ‘apparent’. This can mean clear as in ‘for no apparent reason’ or unclear, as in ‘his apparent lack of concern’. It really is a wonder we manage to understand each other sometimes 😉

That’s my musing for the day, please do comment with any linguistic fun facts you know of.

Happy reading!

Michelle De Aizpurua

The Power of Choice by Cynthia Lord

I remember that magical feeling of choosing books from the scholastic catalogue in primary school! Cynthia makes a great point in her article about reading choice, beautifully illustrated by her story about Crystal. I still love the smell of books too. Whatever it is that inspires a child to choose a book, it’s wonderful to see that spark of excitement. I will have to try using the ‘good choice’ mantra at my school.

Nerdy Book Club

When I was a child, my mother gave me two of the greatest gifts a reader can receive: access to books and choice.

Though not a reader herself, my mother always let me buy three books from the Scholastic Book Club flyers when my teacher sent them home. I would pour over those whispery pages, agonizing how to whittle my choices down to three.

My mother never put any restriction or judgement on the books I picked, so I was free to try new things, to take risks. I was also free to find comfort in something familiar. I was even free to fail, to experience making a choice that I later regretted.

I bought great literature, like The Witch of Blackbird Pond and From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. I also bought (and still have!) The Peanuts Lunch Bag Cookbook. No one would classify…

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Library @ The Dock Youth Unconference – ‘Outside the Lines’ (and Part 1 on Engaging Youth in Libraries)

The ‘Outside the Lines’ Youth Unconference at the Library at the Dock (unconference – “a loosely structured conference emphasizing the informal exchange of information and ideas between participants, rather than following a conventionally structured programme of events”) was an amazing experience. It was totally free and even provided morning and afternoon tea. The presenters were all young and had interesting insights. It was held in a beautiful location on a wonderful sunny day. I had a blast!

Their unconference description:“It is your chance to gain insight into what young adults are interested in, how libraries can support and collaborate with them and how we can broaden our thinking about young people into a more creative, flexible and innovative framework that will take libraries outside the lines. By participating you will have the opportunity to: Hear first-hand from young people and their experiences with the library and community organisations.”

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